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Free eBook on best performing Ad placements for Chitika and AdSense untis

Get Chitika PremiumChitika, the search targeted advertisement network is offering a free guide (eBook) for making the most out of Chitika Premium and AdSense.

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You can download this free eBook from here.

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selfmademinds-chitika

On this site, Chitika Premium ads are displayed immediately following a post’s content. However, the target segment is visitors from the US. Hence to see these ads in action, you’ll have to visit this live demonstration link. Alternatively, they can also be viewed by appending a #chitikatest=keyword(s) at the end of any post’s URL.

Get Chitika PremiumIf you’re interested in serving Chitika Premium ads on your website, you can do so by signing up as a publisher with them.

The collaborative Google Translator Toolkit now sports GTalk chat

Worldwide translationGoogle Translator Toolkit, which is an excellent collaborative translation aid now sports an all new GTalk based chat of the same kind that you have in Gmail.

For those aren’t aware of this nifty add-on to Google Translate, the Translator Toolkit is collaborative workspace where can translate documents (along with your teammates) through a split pane display. Translation jobs can be saved and resumed on demand.

The translation source can be an uploaded document (in a Google Docs supported format), a link to a web-page, a Wikipedia article or a Knol link. Once the document has been processed a rough translation of the same appears beside it in language of your choice. This is the point where all similarities with the mother application (Google Translate) stops and the Toolkit with all it’s collaboration features takes over.

Translator Toolkit split pane display

Active translation jobs can be shared by inviting others the same way it’s done in Google Docs. Apart from that one can also refer to translated blocks saved earlier on or take help of a glossary (that builds up over time) & a dictionary (that suggests alternative translations). Moreover, whenever you enter a more accurate translation in place of a machine based sentence, word or phrase, the same is stored in blocks named Translation Memory or TM. Future jobs draw information from the TMs to provide you dead-accurate translations for repetitive phrases.

For example, if you’re translating the word cancer into Chinese, you will find alternate translations for cancer as a disease and cancer as a quickly-spreading danger so you can find just the right word for your translation:

Translation Alternatives

The addition of the chat feature makes all contacts who can help with with the task available to your in real time – thus expediting the process of translation immensely.

At my workplace, we’ve in the process of translating our entire website into several different languages – and I can foresee what an invaluable aid this will prove to be.

Have you tried the Translator Toolkit yet? What is your opinion?

Via: Official Google Blog

goosh: The Shell Lover’s Google

UNIX ShellThis one’s for all the Unix geeks and shell lovers out there… Goosh is a cool new service that lets you access a large selection of the Google applications through a command-line interface. The hardcore techies will definitely love the look and feel (and functions) of Goosh. The author, Stefen Grothkopp made it pretty clear that it’s not an “Official Google Product” – but is there just for fun.

When you first get to the site, there’s not much to meet the eyes except for some barebones instructions and a shell prompt. But then again – that’s how the real shells are. To get going you’ve to call-up the help page and get a list of available commands. The author had the foresight to implement bash-like aliases – thus cutting down on a lot of typing. The alias for help is h and here’s a screen-shot…

Goosh Screenshot

To perform a simple Google Search, you key in search {searchterms}. For example, if you’re searching for pages on AdSense, you’ll have to key in search AdSense. The actual command to perform a Google Search is “web“, “search” being an alias for it. Apart from normal Google Search, you can also fire away shell commands that call-up the I’m Feeling Lucky function, Google Image Search, Google News + Blog + Feed + Video + Map Search and even Google Translate! That pretty much covers the most utilised Google apps. As an added perk, you can perform Wikipedia searches too. Good job Stefan.

And yup, there are localization commands too – allowing you to change the default language of the interface. Also supported are command history and tab completion.

Goosh is based on Google’s Ajax Search API and is one of the best implementations of it I’ve come across so far.

Found via: My SysAd Blog

Gmail Labs! Google rolls out another surprise…

So Google’s at it again! Last night this all new link titled Gmail Labs materialised out of thin air in my Gmail interface. It turned up in one of my accounts only – which means Google’s rolling it out gradually – just as they’ve done with their earlier surprises. So expect it to turn up in your inbox sooner or later. Till then, keep a watch out for a bold, red link that says New! Gmail Labs right beside the Settings link.

And what’s cooking in the Gmail Labs?

From what I figured, the Gmail Labs will act as the stage for the introduction of a bunch of useful as well as fun plug-ins coded by Google’s staff and/or independent developers. These plug-ins will add extra functionality to various aspects of the Gmail interface. Provided along with each plug-in are feedback links. Those which receive the highest votes will probably be integrated into Gmail in future, while the poor performers will be taken off-air immediately.

Examples

Gmail Labs Settings Screen

Quick Links: This will provide a bookmarking container for your most frequently accessed links and fit in smugly in the leftmost column of the Gmail interface. You can use it for saving frequent searches, important individual messages, and more.

Superstars: Tired of the STAR icon that helps you mark important messages? Superstars will add in a bunch of multi-coloured icons (exclamation marks, check marks etc.) with which you can clearly demarcate mails of varying degree of importance.

Pictures in chat: This will help is displaying your and your friends’ Gmail profile pic. in the embedded GTalk window while you chat.

Others include Fixed-Width Font, Custom Keyboard Shortcuts, Mouse Gestures, Random Signatures etc. The whole list can be found in the Gmail Labs Settings page – which appears as a separate tab under the Settings link.

What if the plug-ins mess-up my Gmail interface?

Google’s kept an escape hatch ready for you in case any of these plug-ins behave abnormally. Simply follow this link to temporarily disable the Gmail Labs feature » http://mail.google.com/mail/?labs=0

I found the first two in the list particularly useful. How about you?

Google Presently goes live… finally !

Finally the wait is over. Google’s managed to round-up it’s online office suite by launching Google Presentation – the online equivalent of Microsoft’s PowerPoint. However, long standing speculations regarding the name of this application has been proven wrong in the sense that this app. isn’t called Presently – rather this app. doesn’t have a name at all. It’s being referred to as simply Presentation or Google Presentation.

Google Presentations from File Manager The application can be launched from the Google Docs file manager. Click on New and you’ll notice a new addition to the drop-down menu, titled Presentation.

It’s a pretty basic application and the features offered as on now will leave you wanting. You can import PowerPoint files lesser than 10MB in size and work on them directly. It doesn’t offer much in the way of exporting your presentations – except for HTML files with images. Themes and layouts are supported but there aren’t too many available options and no way of importing your own themes either. Short documents can be used to fetch the starting material for the first slide of a presentation. External objects cannot be embedded and transitions are missing altogether.

As it is with other Google Apps – you can share / collaborate the presentations and work on them as a group. To facilitate group-work, there’s an inline group-chat system based on GTalk that lets you communicate with active collaborators and viewers.

Google Presentation Screenshot

All in all it offers far less than the contemporary online presentation creators like Zoho Show and Preezo.

Google will continue to roll out enhancements over the next few months and hopefully soon we’ll have at hand a pretty strong competitor of PowerPoint.

Incidentally, the Google suite of apps. have undergone a minor name change. Instead of Docs & Spreadsheets, it’s now called Google Docs.

Found via: Google Operating System, Google Presentations Finally Launched

Cricket Scores: When all else fails, Google prevails

Cricket ImplementsThis one is for all the Cricket aficionados out there who’re on the move and desperately need to catch up with the scores of an extreme match. Can’t exactly recall that live score reporting service? Fear not, for Google is there to save the day for you. Simply type in the words “cricket” along with the names of the participating countries. The first returned result will tell you the real-time updated scores.

Can’t recall both the playing sides? No problem. As long as you can type in the name of one of the playing countries, you job’s done.

Repeating the same search brings up different scorecards – that is, for other matches played recently by these countries – but the most recent one is usually displayed first.

And if you type cricket without any accompanying country name, what you get is a random pick from the most recent matches being played worldwide. Along with the miniature score-sheet, you’re provided quick-links to a couple of sites like CricBuzz, CricInfo and Willow. Click on them and you get to the detailed live scorecards – a very handy service.

Here are a couple of screen-shots…

Google Cricket Scores Screen-shot #1

Google Cricket Scores Screen-shot #2

Have fun…

Bored at home? Take your F16 for a spin with Google Sky

F16The all new Google Sky comes with it’s own share of Easter Eggs. A little known fact is that there’s a fully functional flight-simulator integrated into this galactic browser. According to reports, this feature unlocks and appears as a distinct item in your Tools Menu after you’ve played around for a bit with the latest version of Google Sky. The simulator can be fired up by pressing Ctrl + Alt + A too.

Now don’t go off expecting it to be anything like the Microsoft Flight Simulator – but it’s definitely looks very promising. To start with there are two available aircrafts – the F16 and the SR22. Aileron, Elevator, Rudder, Flaps etc. – all the basic controls up and running. Once up in the air, the cruising can be done through both your keyboard and mouse. Here’s a complete list of keyboard shortcuts. If you’d rather prefer to use your joystick – there’s support for that too.

As of now, there are a list of prefixed fly-by zones (about 27) from which you’ve have to determine your flight-plan. By default, it’s set to Kathmandu Airport (Nepal) and you can get rocking and rolling all over the Himalayas in no time. Here’s a snapshot while banking right outside the airport.

Google Sky Flight Simulator Screenshot

If you need a quick coffee-break, just hit Space to get frozen mid-air.

Our favourite earth-browser just keeps getting funner and funner. Grab yourself a copy and get flying right-away.

Found via: Google Operating System, Google Earth Easter Egg: Flight Simulator

The supercharged Google AdSense Referrals 2.0 ! More choices, more revenue

Just today morning, as I logged into my AdSense account a tiny message flashed below the block that displays your income overview reports.

Google AdSense Referrals 2.0 added to account

Exhilarated at the prospect of something new, I clicked on the link and let out a gasp the moment the Referrals screen finished loading. Last I’d seen of the Referrals was those measly 4 or 5 products that were being offered (for which I wrote the Google AdSense Referral Rotator widget for WordPress sidebars). It’s entirely changed now with a massive list of available referrals that can be chosen either on a worldwide or per country basis.

Banned from AdSenseThis came as a very big surprise to me, since I’d been away from AdSense for a good while. The same day that I was getting married I somehow managed to get myself banned from AdSense. The reason was invalid clicks. Quite naturally I filed an appeal and reasoned with them that it couldn’t have been me who was producing those clicks. I added that I could furnish additional travel documents if required. That seemed to do the trick. My account got reinstated a couple of days back along with the whole prior balance. Sweet !

Anyway, back to the topic. Google Referrals now come with a horde of choices. They’re divided into categories like Google Products, Automotive, Business, Computer & Electronics etc. The coolest part is that you don’t have to hand-pick and generate the referral code for each individual product anymore. Get more revenueYou’ve got this Ad Shopping Cart, where you can place your selected products (15 at the most) or add entire categories (10 at a time). In case you add the categories, the best performing ads are automatically displayed.

The code that is generated from your selections keeps rotating the referrals on its own – making my WordPress plug-in sort of redundant. But an overjoyed at the fact that this auto-rotating feature has been integrated into AdSense – it was long overdue. In effect, the random picks of best performing ads maximises the chances of clicks and referral sign-ups by tenfolds thus earning you a whole lot more revenue than earlier on. The referrals are now available in most of the standard Ad Unit formats of AdSense.

AdSense Referrals 2.0 Setup Screen-shot

From what I figured the new Referrals 2.0 feature is being gradually rolled out to all AdSense publishers. Has it managed to find it’s way into your account yet? And in case you don’t own an AdSense account yet, you can always use the following link to sign-up for one. It’s fast and easy to use, it’s free and it earns you a whole bunch of $$.

Take a space trip with Google Sky

Sun, Earth & SapceYou don’t need to be a billionaire to take a trip through space anymore. With Google Sky (Google Earth v4.2), you can do just that. You’ll be amazed to know that exploration of star constellations, viewing planetary motions or supernova explosions is just a mouse-click away with this new release of Google Earth.

This new feature in Google Sky has been dubbed the “virtual telescope” and can be accessed via View > Switch to Sky in the top menu. This has been made possible through images that were …

stitched together from more than one million photographs from scientific and academic sources, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Palomar Observatory at the California Institute of Technology and the NASA-financed Hubble.

Another new introduction (though pretty limited in scope as of now) is the ultra-high resolution imagery of select places accessible through Primary Database > Featured Content > Gigapxl Photos.

Source: Google Blogoscoped, Google Sky Released

A whacking Google Indic Transliteration tool at the Google Labs, India page

Google Labs has launched a new page for it’s Indian counterpart where two tools have been listed for trial by the sub-continental users. Incidentally, Google Labs is the place where most of the experimental projects are posted by their engineers.

The hot new tools are…

  1. Indic On-Screen Keyboard (iGoogle Gadget) that allows one to perform searches in any of the (available) Indian languages.

  2. Google Indic Transliteration tool that converts any written text in English into Hindi (Devanāgarī characters), the moment you hit space. For example, if you type Google it gets auto-converted to गूगल.

Google Indic Transliteration Tool ScreenshotIf you’ve used Avro Keyboard earlier on for transliterating Bengali, you’ll know what I’m talking about – except that this works for Hindi. In case you don’t get your desired spelling, you can always click on a word to get a drop-down list of suggestions. In the word you’re seeking doesn’t exist in that list, you can always go ahead and edit it using a pop-up on-screen Indic keyboard. From what I saw this is going to serve as an excellent means for typing in DevanāgarÄ« script for those who don’t want to go through the painstaking process of learning the Indic keyboard layout.

There are a couple of issue with font rendering though. The help page for iGoogle Gadgets, says..

Oriya font rendering seems to be broken under IE. Firefox does not seem to support Oriya at all. Bengali (and Assamese) fonts are often too tiny and seem to be placed a few pixels lower than required. Many browsers do not render some of the Malayalam chillus and conjuncts correctly.

Google seems to be finally catching up on offering truly localised services outside of the U.S.

Found via: Google Blogoscoped